Did you know “Jack and Jill” comes from a Scandinavian Folktale?

Did you know that the popular and well known nursery rhyme “Jack and Jill” comes from a Scandinavian Folktale written in the Prose Edda? The Scandinavian version of the rhyme tells the story of two Norse children who were sent to pull up song-mead from Mimir’s Well. On their way back home, the two children and their bucket full of song-mead were carried off by the moon god. In chapter 11 of the 13th-century Prose Edda Gylfaginning, written by Icelandic historian Snorri Sturluson, tells of Hjúki and Bil, brother and sister…

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Is Bigfoot a Troll from Norse Folklore?

Is Bigfoot, also known as Sasquatch, the same mythical creature known as a Troll in Norse folklore? It is generally thought Bigfoot is a yet to be discovered man/ape hominid that is wandering the forests of North America. There are Bigfoot sightings reported from the Appalachian Mountains to the Rocky Mountains and in the forests in between. Can a hominid exist everywhere on the continent without ever once being caught? I submit this is not credible. We are not dealing with an animal enigma. Either this is all a hoax inspiring more hoaxes and…

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Tales from the Norse – Tom Totherhouse

Once on a time there was a Goody who had a deaf husband. A good easy man he was, but that was just why she thought more of the lad next door, whom they called “Tom Totherhouse.” Now the lad that served the deaf man saw very well that the two had something between them, and one day he said to the Goody,— A Goody or Goodwife is usually a married woman of lowly station. “Dare you wager ten dollars, mother, that I don’t make you lay bare your own…

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Huldra, Folklore’s Lady in the Forest

A huldra is a dangerous seductive forest creature found in Scandinavian folklore. She is a member of a family of a very ancient beings that inhabit the forest, but remain hidden from humankind. In Scandinavian folklore, the huldra (Norwegian, derived from a root meaning “covered,” “hidden,” or “secret”) is a very elusive and seductive creature of the forest. The huld-rå being is a rå, which is a keeper or warden of a particular location or landform. The different species of rå are sometimes distinguished according to the different spheres of nature with which they…

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The Serpent Dragon Fafnir

The Völsunga saga tells of the legendary hero Sigurd and of his slaying of the dragon Fafnir. Fafnir was a dwarven prince that was cursed into becoming a dragon by Andvari’s stolen gold and magical ring. Read about: The Curse of Andvari’s Stolen Gold and Magical Ring The Völsunga saga tell us that the Æsir gods Odin, Loki, and Hœnir, were out traveling and came across Ótr (otter), who was shape-shifted as an otter. Ótr was the son of Hreidmar, King of the Dwarves. Loki killed the otter (which was Ótr shape-shifted as an otter) with a stone and then the three Æsir, Odin, Loki, and…

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The Curse of Andvari’s Stolen Gold and Magical Ring. My Precious!

The Völsunga saga tells of the legendary hero Sigurd and of his slaying of the dragon Fafnir. Fafnir was a dwarven prince that was cursed into becoming a dragon from Andvari’s stolen gold and magical ring. Andvari, meaning”careful one” in Old Norse, is a dwarf who lives underneath a waterfall and has the power to change himself into a fish at will. Andvari had a treasure of gold and a magical ring named Andvaranaut. It is said, his magic ring helped him become wealthy. The Völsunga saga tells us: Loki used a net provided by the Norse goddess Rán, to catch…

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Draugr, The Viking Walking Dead

The will of the Norse appears to be very strong. Strong enough for them to draw their hugr back to their own body. Reanimating it so they can walk amongst the living again. These are the Walking Dead in Norse folklore. Draug are undead figures from Norse and Icelandic mythology/folklore that appear to retain some semblance of intelligence. They exist either to guard their treasure, wreak havoc on living beings, or torment those who had wronged them in life.  Thorolf Halt-Foot was known to have reincarnated as a draugr and become…

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Giants once walked the Earth and your own DNA can prove it.

There may be some truth to the old legends of giants in just about every culture in the World. The Norse (Vikings) called giants, “jötnar” pronounced “yoot-nar” (singular: jotunn or jotun). They are also known to the Norse as the þursar (singular þurs, pronounced “thurs”), which are a race of giants that live in a place the Norse call Jötunheimr. Jötunheimr literally translates from Old Norse as “Giant Home.” There was also referencing to Utgard (Old Norse Útgarðr) in Norse Mythology as being the home of giants.  There is much…

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