Hörgr – Altars of Stone

The Norse built many altars of stone called, Hörgr (plural hörgar). A hörgr is a type of cairn, which is an altar or shrine made of stones that are either piled, heaped, or stacked. They are used in Norse religion, as opposed to a roofed hall used as a hof (temple). These stone altars called hörgr are attested in the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda, in the sagas of Icelanders, skaldic poetry, and its Old English cognate in Beowulf. The term hörgr is used three times in poems collected in the Poetic Edda. In a stanza early in the…

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The Apple of Life from the Garden of Iðunn

Iðunn is the Norse goddess tasked as being the keeper of the golden apples that maintain the eternal youthfulness of the gods. Since the gods are not immortal, the apples are considered to be very precious. The Apples of Life come from the garden of Iðunn. Iðunn (also Idun, Idunn or Ithun) is the wife of the Norse god Bragi, who is the god of poetry. Since the gods are not immortal, the apples are considered very precious. (How to pronounce Iðunn <Listen here> or <here-click blue triangle to listen> /ˈɪːðʏn(ː)/  : -ɪːðʏn – Sounds like:…

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Fólkvangr, Freyja welcomes you to the Field of the Host

Fólkvangr is a meadow or field ruled by the Norse goddess Freyja. It is where half of those that have died in combat go upon their deaths. The other half go to the Norse god Odin in the Halls of Valhalla. Fólkvangr is attested in the Poetic Edda and the Prose Edda.  Fólkvangr is a field where Freyja receives half of those who died in battle and it is also the name of a ship. Both the field and the ship are attested in the Prose Edda. Their are three primary places where…

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